Mediators of Inflammation

Mediators of Inflammation / 2007 / Article

Clinical Study | Open Access

Volume 2007 |Article ID 45794 | 5 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2007/45794

Proinflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Patients with Periodontal Disease

Received31 Jan 2007
Revised23 May 2007
Accepted25 May 2007
Published30 Aug 2007

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the involvement of proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers in gingival tissue in individuals with chronic periodontitis. Subject and methods. Eighteen subjects were divided in two groups: experimental (age 52.9±5.0) and control (age 51.1±9.6). The activities of enzymatic antioxidants such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase, nonenzymatic antioxidants: total glutathione and reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) were evaluated in gingival tissues from interproximal sites. Statistical differences between groups were determined by independent Student t test and P<.05. Results. Individuals with periodontal disease exhibited a significant increase in the activities of MPO, GPx, GST, and also in TBARS and GSSG levels in gingival tissue compared to the control group (P<.05). Conclusion. The results of the present work showed an important correlation between oxidative stress biomarkers and periodontal disease.

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Copyright © 2007 Ivan Borges Jr. et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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