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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2007, Article ID 53805, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/53805
Research Article

High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein Induction by Mycobacterium Bovis BCG

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunobiology, University of Szeged, Szeged 6720, Hungary
2Department of Medical Biology, University of Szeged, Szeged 6720, Hungary
3Proteomics Research Group, Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged 6720, Hungary
4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
5Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014, Finland

Received 1 June 2007; Accepted 9 October 2007

Copyright © 2007 Péter Hofner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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