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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2008, Article ID 512196, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/512196
Research Article

Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 Induces the Translocation and Secretion of High Mobility Group-1 Protein from Both Activated T Cells and Monocytes

1Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences, Diamond Health Care Centre, Department of Medicine, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 1M9
2Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 3J5

Received 6 August 2008; Accepted 26 September 2008

Academic Editor: Tania Fröde

Copyright © 2008 Shirin Kalyan and Anthony W. Chow. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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