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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 436145, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/436145
Research Article

Release of Danger Signals during Ischemic Storage of the Liver: A Potential Marker of Organ Damage?

1Experimental Transplantation Surgery, Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Drackendorfer Str.1, 07747 Jena, Germany
2The Centre for Molecular Medicine, Shaoxing People's Hospital, 312000 Shaoxing, China
3Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg and Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany
4Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Jena, 07747 Jena, Germany
5Department of Clinical Chemistry, Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg and Essen, 45122 Essen, Germany

Received 7 July 2010; Accepted 4 October 2010

Academic Editor: F. D'Acquisto

Copyright © 2010 Anding Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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