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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2011, Article ID 949072, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/949072
Review Article

Cross-Talk between Apolipoprotein E and Cytokines

1Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, 130021 Changchun, China
2Division of Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Novum, plan 5, 141 86 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 13 March 2011; Accepted 2 May 2011

Academic Editor: Steven Kunkel

Copyright © 2011 Hongliang Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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