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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 126463, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/126463
Review Article

Intravitreal Devices for the Treatment of Vitreous Inflammation

1Retina Division, Department of Ophthalmology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43212, USA
2Department of Ophthalmology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43212, USA

Received 14 June 2012; Accepted 31 July 2012

Academic Editor: Mario R. Romano

Copyright © 2012 John B. Christoforidis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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