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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 274347, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/274347
Research Article

Human Mast Cells (HMC-1 5C6) Enhance Interleukin-6 Production by Quiescent and Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

1Division of Allergy, Clinical Immunology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA
2Kansas City, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, MO 64128, USA

Received 26 August 2011; Accepted 11 October 2011

Academic Editor: Julio Galvez

Copyright © 2012 Damandeep S. Walia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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