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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 294070, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/294070
Research Article

Essential Role of Mast Cells in the Visceral Hyperalgesia Induced by T. spiralis Infection and Stress in Rats

Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191, China

Received 16 September 2011; Accepted 18 December 2011

Academic Editor: Amal O. Amer

Copyright © 2012 Chang-Qing Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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