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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 484167, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/484167
Review Article

Pathophysiological Changes to the Peritoneal Membrane during PD-Related Peritonitis: The Role of Mesothelial Cells

Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong

Received 15 October 2011; Revised 18 January 2012; Accepted 18 January 2012

Academic Editor: Nicholas Topley

Copyright © 2012 Susan Yung and Tak Mao Chan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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