Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 720976, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/720976
Clinical Study

IL-8, IL-10, TGF-, and GCSF Levels Were Increased in Severe Persistent Allergic Asthma Patients with the Anti-IgE Treatment

1Allergy and Clinical Immunology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Antalya Training and Research Hospital, 07070 Antalya, Turkey
2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, 58185 Linköping, Sweden
3Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana, Turkey
4Division of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Toronto Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2C4

Received 3 August 2012; Revised 18 October 2012; Accepted 22 November 2012

Academic Editor: Gustavo Duarte Pimentel

Copyright © 2012 Arzu D. Yalcin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. G. P. Anderson, “Endotyping asthma: new insights into key pathogenic mechanisms in a complex, heterogeneous disease,” The Lancet, vol. 372, no. 9643, pp. 1107–1119, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. J. Lotvall, C. Akdis, L. B. Bacharier et al., “Asthma endotypes: a new approach to classification of disease entities within the asthma syndrome,” American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, vol. 127, no. 2, pp. 355–360, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. M. Larche, D. S. Robinson, and A. B. Kay, “The role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma,” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 111, pp. 450–463, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  4. M. M. Epstein, “Targeting memory Th2 cells for the treatment of allergic asthma,” Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 109, pp. 107–136, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. D. S. Robinson, Q. Hamid, S. Ying et al., “Predominant T(H2)-like bronchoalveolar T-lymphocyte population in atopic asthma,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 326, no. 5, pp. 298–304, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. Wills-Karp and F. D. Finkelman, “Untangling the complex web of IL-4- and IL-13-mediated signaling pathways,” Science Signaling, vol. 1, no. 51, p. pe55, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. A. M. Cooper and S. A. Khader, “IL-12p40: an inherently agonistic cytokine,” Trends in Immunology, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 33–38, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. R. K. Kumar, D. C. Webb, C. Herbert, and P. S. Foster, “Interferon-γ as a possible target in chronic asthma,” Inflammation and Allergy, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 253–256, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. M. John, S. Lim, J. Seybold et al., “Inhaled corticosteroids increase interleukin-10 but reduce macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interferon-γ release from alveolar macrophages in asthma,” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 157, no. 1, pp. 256–262, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. J. Pene, S. Chevalier, L. Preisser et al., “Chronically inflamed human tissues are infiltrated by highly differentiated Th17 lymphocytes,” The Journal of Immunology, vol. 180, pp. 7423–7430, 2008. View at Google Scholar
  11. Y. H. Wang, K. S. Voo, B. Liu et al., “A novel subset of CD4+ TH2 memory/ effector cells that produce inflammatory IL-17 cytokine and promote the exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 207, no. 11, pp. 2479–2491, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. N. Yamashita, H. Tashimo, H. Ishida et al., “Attenuation of airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine asthma model by neutralization of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF),” Cellular Immunology, vol. 219, no. 2, pp. 92–97, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. F. L. Dente, S. Carnevali, M. L. Bartoli et al., “Profiles of proinflammatory cytokines in sputum from different groups of severe asthmatic patients,” Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 97, no. 3, pp. 312–320, 2006. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. K. Shute, B. Vrugt, I. J. D. Lindley et al., “Free and complexed interleukin-8 in blood and bronchial mucosa in asthma,” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 155, no. 6, pp. 1877–1883, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. M. A. Berry, B. Hargadon, M. Shelley et al., “Evidence of a role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in refractory asthma,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 354, pp. 697–708, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  16. A. Jatakanon, C. Uasuf, W. Maziak, S. Lim, K. F. Chung, and P. J. Barnes, “Neutrophilic inflammation in severe persistent asthma,” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 160, no. 5 I, pp. 1532–1539, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. S. K. Saha, C. Doe, V. Mistry et al., “Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression in induced sputum and bronchial mucosa in asthma and COPD,” Thorax, vol. 64, no. 8, pp. 671–676, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. M. Silvestri, M. Bontempelli, M. Giacomelli et al., “High serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in severe asthma: markers of systemic inflammation?” Clinical and Experimental Allergy, vol. 36, no. 11, pp. 1373–1381, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. V. Fahy, H. E. Fleming, H. H. Wong et al., “The effect of an anti-IgE monoclonal antibody on the early- and late- phase responses to allergen inhalation in asthmatic subjects,” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 155, no. 6, pp. 1828–1834, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. O. Noga, G. Hanf, I. Brachmann et al., “Effect of omalizumab treatment on peripheral eosinophil and T-lymphocyte function in patients with allergic asthma,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 117, no. 6, pp. 1493–1499, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. G. Hanf, I. Brachmann, J. Kleine-Tebbe et al., “Omalizumab decreased IgE-release and induced changes in cellular immunity in patients with allergic asthma,” Allergy, vol. 61, no. 9, pp. 1141–1144, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. A. D. Yalcin, A. Bisgin, R. Cetinkaya, and S. Gumuslu, “Clinical efficacy of omalizumab in severe persistent asthma and co-morbid conditions,” EAACI. In press. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  23. J. Roca, J. Sanchis, and A. Agusti-Vidal, “Spirometric reference values from a Mediterranean population,” Clinical Respiratory Physiology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 217–224, 1986. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. C. Hollander, B. Sitkauskiene, R. Sakalauskas, U. Westin, and S. M. Janciauskiene, “Serum and bronchial lavage fluid concentrations of IL-8, SLPI, sCD14 and sICAM-1 in patients with COPD and asthma,” Respiratory Medicine, vol. 101, no. 9, pp. 1947–1953, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. Krogulska, K. Wasowska-Królikowska, E. Polakowska, and S. Chrul, “Cytokine profile in children with asthma undergoing food challenges,” Journal of Investigational Allergology and Clinical Immunology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 43–48, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. A. A. Litonjua, D. Sparrow, L. Guevarra, G. T. O'Connor, S. T. Weiss, and D. J. Tollerud, “Serum interferon-γ is associated with longitudinal decline in lung function among asthmatic patients: the Normative Aging Study,” Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 422–428, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. H. Nakamura, S. T. Weiss, E. Israel, A. D. Luster, J. M. Drazen, and C. M. Lilly, “Eotaxin and impaired lung function in asthma,” American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 160, no. 6, pp. 1952–1956, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. H. Tateno, H. Nakamura, N. Minematsu et al., “Plasma eotaxin level and severity of asthma treated with corticosteroid,” Respiratory Medicine, vol. 98, no. 8, pp. 782–790, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. S. T. Holgate, “Epithelium dysfunction in asthma,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 120, no. 6, pp. 1233–1244, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. R. E. T. Nocker, D. F. M. Schoonbrood, E. A. van de Graaf et al., “Interleukin-8 in airway inflammation in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,” International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 109, no. 2, pp. 183–191, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. H. C. Hsu, P. A. Yang, J. Wang et al., “Interleukin 17-producing T helper cells and interleukin 17 orchestrate autoreactive germinal center development in autoimmune BXD2 mice,” Nature Immunology, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 166–175, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. Y. C. Sun, Q. T. Zhou, and W. Z. Yao, “Sputum interleukin-17 is increased and associated with airway neutrophilia in patients with severe asthma,” Chinese Medical Journal, vol. 118, no. 11, pp. 953–956, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. S. G. Trivedi and C. M. Lloyd, “Eosinophils in the pathogenesis of allergic airways disease,” Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, vol. 64, no. 10, pp. 1269–1289, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. E. M. Minshall, D. Y. M. Leung, R. J. Martin et al., “Eosinophil-associated TGF-β1 mRNA expression and airways fibrosis in bronchial Asthma,” American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 326–333, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. J. Y. Cho, M. Miller, K. J. Baek et al., “Inhibition of airway remodeling in IL-5-deficient mice,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 113, no. 4, pp. 551–560, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C. E. Brightling, P. Bradding, F. A. Symon, S. T. Holgate, A. J. Wardlaw, and I. D. Pavord, “Mast-cell infiltration of airway smooth muscle in asthma,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 346, no. 22, pp. 1699–1705, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. F. Chung, “Anti-inflammatory cytokines in asthma and allergy: Interleukin-10, interleukin-12, interferon-γ,” Mediators of Inflammation, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 51–59, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. A. D. Yalcin, “Bisgin A The relation of sTRAIL levels and quality of life in severe persistent allergic asthma patients using omalizumab,” Medical Science Monitor, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. LE9–LE10, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  39. A. D. Yalcin and A. Bisgin, “Omalizumab: anti-IgE therapy in severe allergic conditions,” Allergy & Therapy Journals, vol. 3, article 120.
  40. C. J. Corrigan and A. B. Kay, “CD4 T-lymphocyte activation in acute severe asthma. Relationship to disease severity and atopic status,” American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 141, no. 4, pp. 970–977, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. H. Saito, T. Hayakawa, H. Mita, Y. Yui, and T. Shida, “Augmentation of leukotriene C4 production by gamma interferon in leukocytes challenged with an allergen,” International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology, vol. 87, no. 3, pp. 286–293, 1988. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. A. Friebe and H. D. Volk, “Stability of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 in blood samples of patients with systemic immune activation,” Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, vol. 132, no. 11, pp. 1802–1806, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. A. D. Yalcin, R. M. Gorczynski, G. E. Parlak et al., “Total antioxidant capacity, hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde and total nitric oxide concentrations in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma: its relation to omalizumab treatment,” Clinical Laboratory, vol. 58, no. 1-2, pp. 89–96, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  44. A. D. Yalcin, A. Bisgin, A. Kargi, and R. M. Gorczynski, “Serum soluble TRAIL levels in patients with severe persistent allergic asthma: its relation to Omalizumab treatment,” Medical Science Monitor, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 11–15, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  45. A. D. Yalcin, S. Gumuslu, G. E. Parlak et al., “Systemic levels of ceruloplasmin oxidase activity in allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis,” Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 1047–1053, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  46. C. A. Bates and P. E. Silkoff, “Exhaled nitric oxide in asthma: from bench to bedside,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 111, no. 2, pp. 256–262, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. M. B. Pepys and M. L. Baltz, “Acute phase proteins with special reference to C-reactive protein and related proteins (pentaxins) and serum amyloid A protein,” Advances in Immunology, vol. 34, pp. 141–212, 1983. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. P. Jousilahti, V. Salomaa, K. Hakala, V. Rasi, E. Vahtera, and T. Palosuo, “The association of sensitive systemic inflammation markers with bronchial asthma,” Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 381–385, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus