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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2012, Article ID 946813, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/946813
Review Article

Role of Prostaglandins in Neuroinflammatory and Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Department of Pharmacology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Avenida Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Avenida Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Brazil
3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Muenzinger Building, Colorado University of Colorado Boulder, Avenida, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA
4Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg Medical School, Hauptstraße 5, 79104 Freiburg, Germany
5VivaCell Biotechnology GmbH, Ferdinand-Porsche-Straße 5, 79211 Denzlingen, Germany

Received 15 December 2011; Accepted 5 April 2012

Academic Editor: Lúcia Helena Faccioli

Copyright © 2012 Isabel Vieira de Assis Lima et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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