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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 102457, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/102457
Research Article

Flavonoid Naringenin: A Potential Immunomodulator for Chlamydia trachomatis Inflammation

1Department of Biological Sciences, Center for NanoBiotechnology and Life Sciences Research (CNBR), Alabama State University, 1627 Hall Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, USA
2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue, SL-38, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Received 12 February 2013; Revised 7 April 2013; Accepted 8 April 2013

Academic Editor: Fulvio D'Acquisto

Copyright © 2013 Abebayehu N. Yilma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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