Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 148526, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/148526
Clinical Study

Association of Serum Adiponectin, Leptin, and Resistin Concentrations with the Severity of Liver Dysfunction and the Disease Complications in Alcoholic Liver Disease

1Department of Gastroenterology with Endoscopy Unit, Medical University of Lublin, 8 Jaczewski Street, 20-954 Lublin, Poland
2Department of Clinical Immunology, Medical University of Lublin, 4A Chodzki Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
3Department of Mathematics and Biostatistics, Medical University of Lublin, 4 Jaczewski Street, 20-090 Lublin, Poland

Received 28 April 2013; Revised 21 August 2013; Accepted 5 September 2013

Academic Editor: Elizabeth J. Kovacs

Copyright © 2013 Beata Kasztelan-Szczerbinska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and aims. There is growing evidence that white adipose tissue is an important contributor in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We investigated serum concentrations of total adiponectin (Acrp30), leptin, and resistin in patients with chronic alcohol abuse and different grades of liver dysfunction, as well as ALD complications. Materials and Methods. One hundred forty-seven consecutive inpatients with ALD were prospectively recruited. The evaluation of plasma adipokine levels was performed using immunoenzymatic ELISA tests. Multivariable logistic regression was applied in order to select independent predictors of advanced liver dysfunction and the disease complications. Results. Acrp30 and resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with ALD than in controls. Lower leptin levels in females with ALD compared to controls, but no significant differences in leptin concentrations in males, were found. High serum Acrp30 level revealed an independent association with advanced liver dysfunction, as well as the development of ALD complications, that is, ascites and hepatic encephalopathy. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in serum leptin concentrations may influence the ALD course, different in females compared with males. Serum Acrp30 level may serve as a potential prognostic indicator for patients with ALD.