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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 183041, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/183041
Review Article

Testosterone-Induced Effects on Lipids and Inflammation

1Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, Via Aldo Moro 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133 Milan, Italy
3Department of Health Science, University of “Magna Graecia” Catanzaro and Drug Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Via di Val Cannuta 247, 00163 Roma, Italy

Received 28 January 2013; Accepted 8 March 2013

Academic Editor: Metoda Lipnik-Stangelj

Copyright © 2013 Stella Vodo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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