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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 187873, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/187873
Research Article

Inhibition of Cathepsin S Produces Neuroprotective Effects after Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

1Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002, China
2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA

Received 25 June 2013; Revised 16 August 2013; Accepted 4 September 2013

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2013 Jianguo Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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