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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 384807, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/384807
Research Article

Heat Shock Proteins 60 and 70 Specific Proinflammatory and Cytotoxic Response of CD4+CD28null Cells in Chronic Kidney Disease

1Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh 160 012, India
2George Institute of Global Health, Splendor Forum, Jasola, New Delhi 110 025, India

Received 8 July 2013; Revised 3 October 2013; Accepted 11 October 2013

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2013 Ashok K. Yadav et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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