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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 391473, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/391473
Review Article

Pre- and Posttherapy Assessment of Intestinal Soluble Mediators in IBD: Where We Stand and Future Perspectives

1Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Policlinico A. Gemelli Hospital, Roma, Italy
2Institute of Pathology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy

Received 19 January 2013; Accepted 3 April 2013

Academic Editor: David Bernardo Ordiz

Copyright © 2013 F. Scaldaferri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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