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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 465319, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/465319
Review Article

How Histopathology Can Contribute to an Understanding of Defense Mechanisms against Cryptococci

1Department of Surgical Pathology, Toho University School of Medicine, 6-11-1 Omori-Nishi, Ota-Ku, Tokyo 143-8541, Japan
2Department of Neurosurgery, Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8515, Japan
3Department of Chemotherapy and Mycoses, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 1-23-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo 162-8640, Japan
4Laboratory of Space and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga, Itabashi, Tokyo 173-8605, Japan
5Teikyo University Institute of Medical Mycology, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0395, Japan
6Department of Dermatology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 18 July 2013

Academic Editor: Donna-Marie McCafferty

Copyright © 2013 Yoichiro Okubo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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