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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 609602, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/609602
Research Article

Gestational Exposure to a Viral Mimetic Poly(I:C) Results in Long-Lasting Changes in Mitochondrial Function by Leucocytes in the Adult Offspring

1Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2Medical Investigations of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
3Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

Received 15 July 2013; Accepted 16 August 2013

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Valacchi

Copyright © 2013 Cecilia Giulivi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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