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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 741804, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/741804
Research Article

Biphasic Modulation of NOS Expression, Protein and Nitrite Products by Hydroxocobalamin Underlies Its Protective Effect in Endotoxemic Shock: Downstream Regulation of COX-2, IL-1 , TNF- , IL-6, and HMGB1 Expression

1The William Harvey Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK
2Far Manguinhos—FIOCRUZ, R. Sizenando Nabuco 100, 21041-250 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
3Department of Science, University of Basilicata, Potenza, Italy
4Orthomolecular Oncology, Registered Charity No. 1078066, 4 Richmond Road, Oxford OX1 2JJ, UK
5St Catherine’s College, Oxford University, Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UJ, UK

Received 21 December 2012; Revised 19 February 2013; Accepted 19 February 2013

Academic Editor: Fábio Santos Lira

Copyright © 2013 André L. F. Sampaio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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