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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 828354, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/828354
Review Article

S100A8 and S100A9: DAMPs at the Crossroads between Innate Immunity, Traditional Risk Factors, and Cardiovascular Disease

1Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Malmö, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden
2Cardiology Clinic, Skane University Hospital Malmö, Inga Marie Nilssons gata 46, Floor 2, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden
3Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Tîrgu Mureş, 540139 Tîrgu Mureş, Romania

Received 3 October 2013; Revised 21 November 2013; Accepted 21 November 2013

Academic Editor: Stefan Frantz

Copyright © 2013 Alexandru Schiopu and Ovidiu S. Cotoi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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