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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 935608, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/935608
Research Article

Increased Anti-Phospholipid Antibodies in Autism Spectrum Disorders

1Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, USA
2MIND Institute, University of California, 2805 50th Street Sacramento, Davis, CA 95817, USA
3Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Davis, USA
4Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Epidemiology, University of California, Davis, USA
5Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

Received 17 June 2013; Accepted 14 July 2013

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Valacchi

Copyright © 2013 Milo Careaga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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