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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 953462, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/953462
Review Article

Apoptosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes: Possible Roles of Nitric Oxide and the Thioredoxin 1

1School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
2School of Chemistry & Chemical Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China

Received 3 January 2013; Accepted 11 March 2013

Academic Editor: Hidde Bult

Copyright © 2013 Huili Li and Ajun Wan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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