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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013, Article ID 982383, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/982383
Research Article

Poly- -Glutamic Acid Attenuates Angiogenesis and Inflammation in Experimental Colitis

1Research Division Emerging Innovative Technology, Korea Food Research Institute, 516 Baekhyun-Dong, Bundang-Ku, Seongnam Gyeonggi 463-746, Republic of Korea
2University of Science & Technology, Daejeon 305-350, Republic of Korea
3Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, 106 Nanjing Road Qingdao, Shandong 266071, China

Received 10 January 2013; Revised 10 April 2013; Accepted 29 April 2013

Academic Editor: Julio Galvez

Copyright © 2013 Munkhtugs Davaatseren et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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