Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 102160, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/102160
Research Article

5-Lipoxygenase-Dependent Recruitment of Neutrophils and Macrophages by Eotaxin-Stimulated Murine Eosinophils

1Department of Immunology, IMPG, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Bloco I, Room I-2-066, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2Department of Pediatrics, IFF, FIOCRUZ, 22250-020 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
3Department of Medical Microbiology, IMPG, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-590 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Received 14 November 2013; Revised 14 January 2014; Accepted 15 January 2014; Published 25 February 2014

Academic Editor: Shaoheng He

Copyright © 2014 Ricardo Alves Luz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. H. Kita, “Eosinophils: multifaceted biological properties and roles in health and disease,” Immunological Reviews, vol. 242, no. 1, pp. 161–177, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. G. M. Walsh, Ed., Eosinophils: Structure, Functional Properties and Role in Disease, Nova Science, New York, NY, USA, 2012.
  3. M. E. Rothenberg and S. P. Hogan, “The eosinophil,” Annual Review of Immunology, vol. 24, pp. 147–174, 2006. View at Google Scholar
  4. H. F. Rosenberg, S. Phipps, and P. S. Foster, “Eosinophil trafficking in allergy and asthma,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 119, no. 6, pp. 1303–1310, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. A. D. Klion and T. B. Nutman, “The role of eosinophils in host defense against helminth parasites,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 113, no. 1, pp. 30–37, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. E. O'Connell, J. A. Hess, G. A. Santiago et al., “Major basic protein from eosinophils and myeloperoxidase from neutrophils are required for protective immunity to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice,” Infection and Immunity, vol. 79, no. 7, pp. 2770–2778, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. F. D. Finkelman and J. F. Urban Jr., “The other side of the coin: the protective role of the TH2 cytokines,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 107, no. 5, pp. 772–780, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. H. Shin, Y. A. Lee, and D.-Y. Min, “Eosinophil-mediated tissue inflammatory responses in helminth infection,” Korean Journal of Parasitology, vol. 47, pp. S125–S131, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. D. Yang, A. Biragyn, D. M. Hoover, J. Lubkowski, and J. J. Oppenheim, “Multiple roles of antimicrobial defensins, cathelicidins, and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin in host defense,” Annual Review of Immunology, vol. 22, pp. 181–215, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. S. Yousefi, J. A. Gold, N. Andina et al., “Catapult-like release of mitochondrial DNA by eosinophils contributes to antibacterial defense,” Nature Medicine, vol. 14, no. 9, pp. 949–953, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. A. N. Mayeno, A. J. Curran, R. L. Roberts, and C. S. Foote, “Eosinophils preferentially use bromide to generate halogenating agents,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 264, no. 10, pp. 5660–5668, 1989. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. Bystrom, K. Amin, and D. Bishop-Bailey, “Analysing the eosinophil cationic protein—a clue to the function of the eosinophil granulocyte,” Respiratory Research, vol. 12, article 10, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. H. F. Rosenberg, “Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin/RNase 2: connecting the past, the present and the future,” Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 135–140, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. R. C. N. Melo, L. Liu, J. J. Xenakis, and L. A. Spencer, “Eosinophil-derived cytokines in health and disease: unraveling novel mechanisms of selective secretion,” Allergy, vol. 68, pp. 274–284, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. M. J. Christopher and D. C. Link, “Regulation of neutrophil homeostasis,” Current Opinion in Hematology, vol. 14, pp. 3–8, 2007. View at Google Scholar
  16. L. Cassetta, E. Cassol, and G. Poli, “Macrophage polarization in health and disease,” TheScientificWorldJournal, vol. 11, pp. 2391–2402, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. M. A. Giembycz and M. A. Lindsay, “Pharmacology of the eosinophil,” Pharmacological Reviews, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 213–339, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. P. J. Jose, D. A. Griffiths-Johnson, P. D. Collins et al., “Eotaxin: a potent eosinophil chemoattractant cytokine detected in a guinea pig model of allergic airways inflammation,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 179, no. 3, pp. 881–887, 1994. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. F. G. Gervais, R. P. G. Cruz, A. Chateauneuf et al., “Selective modulation of chemokinesis, degranulation, and apoptosis in eosinophils through the PGD2 receptors CRTH2 and DP,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 108, no. 6, pp. 982–988, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. V. E. L. Stubbs, P. Schratl, A. Hartnell et al., “Indomethacin causes prostaglandin D2-like and eotaxin-like selective responses in eosinophils and basophils,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 277, no. 29, pp. 26012–26020, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. G. E. Grant, J. Rokach, and W. S. Powell, “5-Oxo-ETE and the OXE receptor,” Prostaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators, vol. 89, no. 3-4, pp. 98–104, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. M. E. Rothenberg, R. Ownbey, P. D. Mehlhop et al., “Eotaxin triggers eosinophil-selective chemotaxis and calcium flux via a distinct receptor and induces pulmonary eosinophilia in the presence of interleukin 5 in mice,” Molecular Medicine, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 334–348, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. J.-A. Gonzalo, G.-Q. Jia, V. Aguirre et al., “Mouse eotaxin expression parallels eosinophil accumulation during lung allergic inflammation but it is not restricted to a Th2-type response,” Immunity, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 1–14, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. U. Forssmann, M. Uguccioni, P. Loetscher et al., “Eotaxin-2, a novel CC chemokine that is selective for the chemokine receptor CCR3, and acts like eotaxin on human eosinophil and basophil leukocytes,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 185, no. 12, pp. 2171–2176, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. H. Yamada, K. Hirai, M. Miyamasu et al., “Eotaxin is a potent chemotaxin for human basophils,” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, vol. 231, no. 2, pp. 365–368, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. R. T. Palframan, P. D. Collins, T. J. Williams, and S. M. Rankin, “Eotaxin induces a rapid release of eosinophils and their progenitors from the bone marrow,” Blood, vol. 91, no. 7, pp. 2240–2248, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. T. Queto, M. I. Gaspar-Elsas, D. Masid-de-Brito et al., “Cysteinyl-leukotriene type 1 receptors transduce a critical signal for the up-regulation of eosinophilopoiesis by interleukin-13 and eotaxin in murine bone marrow,” Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 885–893, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. A. Menzies-Gow, S. Ying, I. Sabroe et al., “Eotaxin (CCL11) and eotaxin-2 (CCL24) induce recruitment of eosinophils, basophils, neutrophils, and macrophages as well as features of early- and late-phase allergic reactions following cutaneous injection in human atopic and nonatopic volunteers,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 169, no. 5, pp. 2712–2718, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. R. B. Kodali, W. J. H. Kim, I. I. Galaria et al., “CCL11 (Eotaxin) induces CCR3-dependent smooth muscle cell migration,” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 1211–1216, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. F. Jundt, I. Anagnostopoulos, K. Bommert et al., “Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells induce fibroblasts to secrete eotaxin, a potent chemoattractant for T cells and eosinophils,” Blood, vol. 94, no. 6, pp. 2065–2071, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. Miyamasu, T. Nakajima, Y. Misaki et al., “Dermal fibroblasts represent a potent major source of human eotaxin: in vitro production and cytokine-mediated regulation,” Cytokine, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 751–758, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. D. Mangieri, D. Corradi, D. Martorana et al., “Eotaxin/CCL11 in idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis,” Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, vol. 27, pp. 3875–3884, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  33. F. Huaux, M. Gharaee-Kermani, T. Liu et al., “Role of eotaxin-1 (CCL11) and CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) in bleomycin-induced lung injury and fibrosis,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 167, no. 6, pp. 1485–1496, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. A. B. Cheraim, P. Xavier-Elsas, S. H. P. de Oliveira et al., “Leukotriene B4 is essential for selective eosinophil recruitment following allergen challenge of CD4+ cells in a model of chronic eosinophilic inflammation,” Life Sciences, vol. 83, no. 5-6, pp. 214–222, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. C. Yu, A. B. Cantor, H. Yang et al., “Targeted deletion of a high-affinity GATA-binding site in the GATA-1 promoter leads to selective loss of the eosinophil lineage in vivo,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 195, no. 11, pp. 1387–1395, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. S. Ebihara, H. Kurachi, and Y. Watanabe, “A simple preparation method for mouse eosinophils and their responses to anti-allergic drugs,” Inflammation Research, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 112–117, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. M. I. C. Gaspar Elsas, D. Joseph, P. X. Elsas, and B. B. Vargaftig, “Rapid increase in bone-marrow eosinophil production and responses to eosinopoietic interleukins triggered by intranasal allergen challenge,” American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 404–413, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. M. I. C. Gaspar Elsas, P. Xavier Elsas, D. Joseph et al., “Stimulation of early eosinophil progenitors by a heat stable alveolar macrophage product from ovalbumin-sensitized and non-sensitized guinea pigs,” Clinical and Experimental Allergy, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 208–217, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. G. Majno and I. Joris, Cells, Tissues and Disease, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, USA, 2nd edition.
  40. B. Desai, J. Mattson, H. Paintal et al., “Differential expression of monocyte/macrophage-selective markers in human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis,” Experimental Lung Research, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 227–238, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. A. Saxena, A. Panigrahi, S. Gupta et al., “Frequency of T cell expressing Th1 and Th2 associated chemokine receptor in patients with renal allograft dysfunction,” Transplantation Proceedings, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 290–295, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. P. Lopez, I. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, B. Sanchez et al., “Interaction of Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG13195 with HT29 cells influences regulatory-T-cell-associated chemokine receptor expression,” Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 78, pp. 2850–2857, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  43. D. Hartl, S. Krauss-Etschmann, B. Koller et al., “Infiltrated neutrophils acquire novel chemokine receptor expression and chemokine responsiveness in chronic inflammatory lung diseases,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 181, no. 11, pp. 8053–8067, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. C. D. Sadik and A. D. Luster, “Lipid-cytokine-chemokine cascades orchestrate leukocyte recruitment in inflammation,” Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 207–215, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. P. V. Afonso, M. Janka-Junttila, Y. J. Lee et al., “LTB4 Is a signal-relay molecule during neutrophil chemotaxis,” Developmental Cell, vol. 22, pp. 1079–1091, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. A. M. Das, R. J. Flower, and M. Perretti, “Resident mast cells are important for eotaxin-induced eosinophil accumulation in vivo,” Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 156–162, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. R. R. Harris, V. A. Komater, R. A. Marett, D. M. Wilcox, and R. L. Bell, “Effect of mast cell deficiency and leukotriene inhibition on the influx of eosinophils induced by eotaxin,” Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 62, no. 5, pp. 688–691, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. K. D. Stone, C. Prussin, and D. D. Metcalfe, “IgE, mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils,” Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 125, no. 2, pp. S73–S80, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus