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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 143450, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/143450
Research Article

Ecotin-Like ISP of L. major Promastigotes Fine-Tunes Macrophage Phagocytosis by Limiting the Pericellular Release of Bradykinin from Surface-Bound Kininogens: A Survival Strategy Based on the Silencing of Proinflammatory G-Protein Coupled Kinin B2 and B1 Receptors

1Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21990-400 Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil
2Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, 04044-020 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 13 June 2014; Accepted 17 August 2014; Published 10 September 2014

Academic Editor: Marcelo T. Bozza

Copyright © 2014 Erik Svensjö et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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