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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 154561, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/154561
Review Article

Integrating Traditional Medicine into Modern Inflammatory Diseases Care: Multitargeting by Rhus verniciflua Stokes

Laboratory of Clinical Biology and Pharmacogenomics, Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Oriental Medicine, Kyunghee University, 1 Hoegi-dong, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea

Received 17 February 2014; Revised 3 April 2014; Accepted 3 April 2014; Published 12 June 2014

Academic Editor: KyungHyun Kim

Copyright © 2014 Ji Hye Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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