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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 310183, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/310183
Review Article

The Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway Controls the Inflammatory Response in Infections Caused by Pathogenic Bacteria

Centro Multidisciplinario de Estudios en Biotecnología, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Km. 9.5 s/n Carretera Morelia-Zinapécuaro, La Palma, Tarímbaro, 58893 Morelia, MICH, Mexico

Received 14 March 2014; Accepted 27 June 2014; Published 17 July 2014

Academic Editor: Marisa I. Gómez

Copyright © 2014 Octavio Silva-García et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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