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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 312484, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/312484
Research Article

Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Colitis Increases NADPH Oxidase 1 Expression, Oxidative Stress, and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Colon: Preventive Effect of Apocynin

1Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1149, Equipes de Recherches Labellisées CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l’Inflammation, 75018 Paris, France
2Faculté des Sciences Biologiques, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, 16111 Algiers, Algeria
3Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratoire d’Excellence Inflamex, Faculté de Médecine, Site Xavier Bichat, 75018 Paris, France
4Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Xavier Bichat, CIB Phenogen, 75018 Paris, France

Received 22 April 2014; Revised 25 July 2014; Accepted 30 July 2014; Published 4 September 2014

Academic Editor: Magdalena Klink

Copyright © 2014 Souad Mouzaoui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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