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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 426309, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/426309
Review Article

H. pylori Virulence Factors: Influence on Immune System and Pathology

Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Immunologie und Hygiene, Technische Universität München, 81675 Munich, Germany

Received 11 October 2013; Accepted 19 December 2013; Published 21 January 2014

Academic Editor: Alojz Ihan

Copyright © 2014 Behnam Kalali et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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