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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 507208, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/507208
Research Article

Silence of NLRP3 Suppresses Atherosclerosis and Stabilizes Plaques in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice

1Department of Cardiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, 16766 Jingshi Road, Jinan 250014 , China
2Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan 250355, China

Received 10 March 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Tânia Silvia Fröde

Copyright © 2014 Fei Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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