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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 513263, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/513263
Research Article

Elevated OPN, IP-10, and Neutrophilia in Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Confirmed Tuberculosis Patients

1Division of Disaster-Related Infectious Diseases, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574, Japan
2Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8574, Japan
3Japan International Corporation of Welfare Services, 2-3-20 Toranomon YHK Building 4F, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001, Japan
4STD AIDS Cooperative Central Laboratory, San Lazaro Hospital, Quiricada Street, 1003 Manila, Philippines
5Division of Global Epidemiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, North 20, West 10 Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0020, Japan
6Research Division, GalPharma Company, Ltd., NEXT-Kagawa 204, 2217-44 Hayashi-cho, Takamatsu-shi, Kagawa 760-0301, Japan
7Division of Disaster-Related Infectious Diseases, International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574, Japan

Received 24 June 2014; Revised 21 August 2014; Accepted 8 September 2014; Published 15 October 2014

Academic Editor: Sandra Helena Penha Oliveira

Copyright © 2014 Beata Shiratori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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