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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 580919, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/580919
Research Article

Aspirin Modulates Innate Inflammatory Response and Inhibits the Entry of Trypanosoma cruzi in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

1Laboratório de Imunopatologia Experimental, Departamento de Ciências Patológicas, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
2Laboratório de Biologia Molecular de Microrganismos, Departamento de Microbiologia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
3Instituto Israelita de Ensino e Pesquisa Albert Einstein, 056510-901 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Departamento de Ciências Patológicas, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
5Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86057-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil

Received 3 March 2014; Revised 13 May 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 19 June 2014

Academic Editor: Marcelo T. Bozza

Copyright © 2014 Aparecida Donizette Malvezi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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