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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 615917, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/615917
Review Article

Estrogen Signaling in Metabolic Inflammation

1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Medical Investigation Center, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
2Center for Research in Health Technologies and Information Systems (CINTESIS), 4200-450 Porto, Portugal

Received 15 July 2014; Accepted 7 October 2014; Published 23 October 2014

Academic Editor: Dmitri V. Krysko

Copyright © 2014 Rosário Monteiro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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