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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 728619, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/728619
Research Article

The Macrophage Inflammatory Proteins MIP1 (CCL3) and MIP2 (CXCL2) in Implant-Associated Osteomyelitis: Linking Inflammation to Bone Degradation

1Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstraße 200a, 69118 Heidelberg, Germany
2Department of Immunology, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 305, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
3Department of Pathology, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 224, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 16 January 2014; Accepted 18 February 2014; Published 25 March 2014

Academic Editor: Marc Pouliot

Copyright © 2014 Ulrike Dapunt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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