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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 748290, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/748290
Research Article

Hyperthermia Differently Affects Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Permeability in Skeletal Myoblasts and HeLa Cells

1Institute of Cardiology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Sukilėlių Avenue 17, 50009 Kaunas, Lithuania
2Faculty of Natural Sciences, Vytautas Magnus University, 44404 Kaunas, Lithuania
3Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307 Kaunas, Lithuania
4Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Kiel University, Hospitalstraße 4, 24105 Kiel, Germany

Received 17 March 2014; Revised 30 May 2014; Accepted 2 June 2014; Published 20 July 2014

Academic Editor: Sunil Kumar Manna

Copyright © 2014 Ieva Antanavičiūtė et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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