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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014, Article ID 790851, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/790851
Review Article

Flavocoxid, a Nutraceutical Approach to Blunt Inflammatory Conditions

1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Pharmacology, University of Messina, Torre Biologica 5th Floor, AOU Policlinico “G. Martino’’, Via C. Valeria Gazzi, 98125 Messina, Italy
2Department of Paediatric, Gynaecological, Microbiological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Messina, Via C. Valeria Gazzi, 98125 Messina, Italy

Received 6 June 2014; Revised 6 August 2014; Accepted 6 August 2014; Published 24 August 2014

Academic Editor: Fabio Santos Lira

Copyright © 2014 Alessandra Bitto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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