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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 902038, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/902038
Review Article

Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Host Lipid Metabolism

1National Reference Centre for Parasitology, Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1A4
2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 26 April 2014; Accepted 5 August 2014; Published 3 September 2014

Academic Editor: Marcelo T. Bozza

Copyright © 2014 Qianqian Miao and Momar Ndao. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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