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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 243723, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/243723
Review Article

T Regulatory and T Helper 17 Cells in Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome: Facts and Perspectives

1Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia, 06123 Perugia, Italy
2Rheumatology Unit, Department of Biotechnological and Applied Clinical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy

Received 26 January 2015; Revised 14 April 2015; Accepted 16 April 2015

Academic Editor: Alex Kleinjan

Copyright © 2015 Alessia Alunno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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