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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 249205, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/249205
Review Article

The Chaperone Balance Hypothesis: The Importance of the Extracellular to Intracellular HSP70 Ratio to Inflammation-Driven Type 2 Diabetes, the Effect of Exercise, and the Implications for Clinical Management

1Laboratory of Cellular Physiology, Department of Physiology, Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, 90050-170 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2National Institute of Science and Technology in Hormones and Women’s Health (INCT-HSM), 90035-003 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Department of Life Sciences, Regional University of Northwestern Rio Grande do Sul State (UNIJUÍ), 98700-000 Ijuí, RS, Brazil
4School of Biomedical Sciences, CHIRI Biosciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
5Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 9 December 2014; Accepted 12 February 2015

Academic Editor: Magdalena Klink

Copyright © 2015 Mauricio Krause et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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