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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 351732, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/351732
Review Article

Selected Aspects in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

1Department of Genetics, Cell and Immunobiology, Semmelweis University, Budapest 1089, Hungary
2Centre for Immune Regulation and Department of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, 0372 Oslo, Norway
3K.G. Jebsen Center for Influenza Vaccine Research, Institute of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, 0372 Oslo, Norway
4Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital and ORTON Orthopaedic Hospital of the Invalid Foundation, 0280 Helsinki, Finland

Received 23 December 2014; Accepted 24 February 2015

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2015 György Nagy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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