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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 372931, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/372931
Research Article

Glycyrrhizic Acid Promotes M1 Macrophage Polarization in Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages Associated with the Activation of JNK and NF-κB

Key Laboratory of Animal Molecular Nutrition of Education of Ministry, College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, 866 Yu Hang Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058, China

Received 7 July 2015; Revised 10 October 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Yona Keisari

Copyright © 2015 Yulong Mao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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