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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 470458, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/470458
Review Article

Interleukin-17 and Its Implication in the Regulation of Differentiation and Function of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Laboratory for Experimental Hematology and Stem Cells, Institute for Medical Research, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotića 4, P.O. Box 102, 11129 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 12 January 2015; Revised 24 March 2015; Accepted 24 March 2015

Academic Editor: Hermann Gram

Copyright © 2015 Slavko Mojsilović et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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