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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 531518, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/531518
Review Article

Inflammatory Cytokines: Potential Biomarkers of Immunologic Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorders

1Department of Children’s Health, Hunan Children’s Hospital, Hunan, China
2Department of Neurochemistry, NY State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, New York, NY 10314, USA

Received 8 October 2014; Accepted 2 January 2015

Academic Editor: Elaine Hatanaka

Copyright © 2015 Ningan Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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