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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 536894, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/536894
Research Article

Expression of Chemokine Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

1Dialysis Division for Children, Department and Clinic of Pediatrics, SMDZ in Zabrze, SUM in Katowice, Ulica 3 Maja 13/15, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland
2Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, SMDZ in Zabrze, SUM in Katowice, Ulica 3 Maja 13/15, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland
3Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Wrocław Medical University, Ulica Borowska 213, 50-556 Wrocław, Poland
4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, SMDZ in Zabrze, SUM in Katowice, Ulica Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze, Poland
5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, SMDZ in Zabrze, SUM in Katowice, Ulica 3 Maja 13/15, 41-800 Zabrze, Poland

Received 13 September 2014; Revised 18 February 2015; Accepted 27 February 2015

Academic Editor: Gian M. Ghiggeri

Copyright © 2015 Maria Szczepańska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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