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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 545417, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/545417
Research Article

Genetic Deletion and Pharmacological Inhibition of PI3Kγ Reduces Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation and Lung Damage in Mice with Cystic Fibrosis-Like Lung Disease

1Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, A.O.U. S.Luigi Gonzaga, Regione Gonzole 10, Orbassano, 10043 Turin, Italy
2Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Center for Molecular Biotechnology, University of Torino, Via Nizza 52, 10126 Turin, Italy
3Department of Physiopathology, Experimental Medicine, and Public Health, University of Siena, 53100 Siena, Italy
4Department of Neuroscience, University of Torino, 10126 Turin, Italy
5Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, University of Tübingen, 72074 Tübingen, Germany
6Department of Translational Pulmonology, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), German Center for Lung Research (DZL), University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 14 November 2014; Accepted 20 January 2015

Academic Editor: Anshu Agrawal

Copyright © 2015 Maria Galluzzo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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