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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 626530, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/626530
Research Article

Changes of Proteases, Antiproteases, and Pathogens in Cystic Fibrosis Patients’ Upper and Lower Airways after IV-Antibiotic Therapy

1Department of Pediatrics, Cystic Fibrosis Center, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena, Germany
2Septomics Research Center, Friedrich Schiller University, 07745 Jena, Germany
3Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology, Hans Knoell Institute, Jena, Germany
4Department of Dermatology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena, Germany
5Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena, Germany
6Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Jena, 07740 Jena, Germany
7Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena, Germany
8Institute of Medical Statistics, Computer Sciences and Documentation, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena, Germany

Received 19 December 2014; Accepted 18 March 2015

Academic Editor: Christian Taube

Copyright © 2015 Ulrike Müller et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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