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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 638968, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/638968
Review Article

Follicular Helper CD4+ T Cells in Human Neuroautoimmune Diseases and Their Animal Models

1Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China
2Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 25 December 2014; Accepted 16 February 2015

Academic Editor: Peter Szodoray

Copyright © 2015 Xueli Fan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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