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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 720171, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/720171
Research Article

Moringa oleifera Flower Extract Suppresses the Activation of Inflammatory Mediators in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Macrophages via NF-κB Pathway

1Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 30 June 2015; Revised 16 September 2015; Accepted 17 September 2015

Academic Editor: Barbara Romano

Copyright © 2015 Woan Sean Tan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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