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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2015, Article ID 740357, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/740357
Research Article

Progranulin Is Associated with Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

1Institute of Rheumatology, Na Slupi 4, 12850 Prague 2, Czech Republic
2Department of Pathology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Šrobárova 50, 100 34 Prague 10, Czech Republic
3Institute of Biophysics and Informatics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Salmovská 1, 120 00 Prague 2, Czech Republic
4First Orthopaedic Clinic, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, V Úvalu 84, 150 06 Prague 5, Czech Republic
5Department of Rheumatology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Na Slupi 4, 128 50 Prague 2, Czech Republic

Received 25 June 2014; Revised 28 August 2014; Accepted 15 September 2014

Academic Editor: Peter Huszthy

Copyright © 2014 Lucie Andrés Cerezo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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